Book: Week-by-Week Vegetable Gardener’s Handbook

Last year I really wanted to start a garden, but I was very inexperienced and even a little intimidated. Despite my beginner status, I dove right in and got through the season with a lot of trial-and-error and a lot of inefficiency. I wanted to do better this year, yet there seemed to be so many things to learn and I didn’t know where to start.

This past winter I was browsing the book section at a local Plow & Hearth and found the Week-by-Week Vegetable Gardener’s Handbook by father and daughter team, Ron and Jennifer Kujawski. It’s exactly the type of gardening book I had been looking for: one that would break a year’s worth of gardening down into small, manageable tasks, telling me what to do and when to do it.

I’m pretty much a beginner gardener and I think this book is great for beginners. The Kujawskis break down the Handbook into weeks before or after the last frost date. So, all you do is find your last frost date and then fill in the dates at the top of the first page in each section of the book. For example, one section says “9 weeks before average date of last frost”. Since my average date of last frost is around April 16, I grab a calendar and count backward 9 weeks from April 16 and put that date (February 13) at the top of the page in the handbook. In that short section, the Kujawskis tell me which seeds to start around February 13 (eggplant, peppers, and some herbs), how to design a crop rotation plan (with a table showing a typical crop rotation plan), and how to be prepared for a dry season (by making a DIY rain barrel out of a garbage can, as well as few other recommendations for prepping the garden). They even provide a list of drought-tolerant vegetables.

If you want a garden but don’t know where to start, or you have some some experience but you want a little guidance on how to improve your gardening practices, consider the Vegetable Gardener’s Handbook! Aside from being a great gardening guide for what-to-do-when, the Handbook has a lot of excellent bits of garden-related information, tips, and tutorials. It’s been my go-to reference so far this year. The authors even encourage you to scribble notes in the margin, take the book with you to the garden, and get dirty (you and the book)! As they put it, “If after the first growing season, this book has no soil smudges or pencil marks, you probably didn’t have enough fun.”

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By the way, if you don’t k now your average date of last frost, there are several online sources for finding it. You could do what I did and try the frost date listing at Victory Seeds, or go straight to the National Climatic Data Center for the most comprehensive (and also most confusing) data. (Keep in mind that your last frost date isn’t an absolute; it’s just an average, so you could still experience a frost after your last frost date.)

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5 responses to “Book: Week-by-Week Vegetable Gardener’s Handbook

  1. Hi Jess sounds like a good book .I have one that I just got at the Philadelphia flower show from Mike McGrath from the you bet your garden radio show called Growing Great Tomatoes. You should get it I think you will love it. Happy Gardening. Ps. tell the kids @ Shane I said hi Uncle Joe.

    • Thanks! I will have to look for that book. My tomatoes are all still in pots b/c it’s been so cold at night still, and many of my tomato plants are still pretty small.

  2. Yes, this is a great standard of reference. I’ll have to put it up on Caramelize Life. As we discussed, determining your local frost dates is the key! How are the eggplant seedlings doing? G

    • My eggplant and peppers are still in the seed tray, but they look good. Just haven’t gotten real big due to their limited space, I guess. I finally got all of my tomatoes repotted. I’ll be planting them all outside soon, probably this weekend. 🙂

  3. Pingback: Rosemary From Rosemary | In Lehman's Terms

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